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The Formosa Bites food truck is an eye-catching cerulean blue and sports the new business’ slogan, “Happiness you can taste.” Terry Hsieh, and his wife, Doreen Lim, are proud of their burgeoning business.
Formosa Bites is a family affair. Owners Terry Hsieh and Doreen Lim pose by their food truck with their two sons.
Terry Hsieh prepares and cooks all the tasty dishes served from Formosa Bites food truck.
The menu for Formosa Bites food truck includes Red Chili Oil Wontons ($14), Pork Belly Slider ($13) and Taiwanese Popcorn Chicken ($10).

The Formosa Bites food truck is an eye-catching cerulean blue and sports the new business’ slogan, “Happiness you can taste.” Terry Hsieh, and his wife, Doreen Lim, are proud of their burgeoning business.
A recent addition to the area fleet of food trucks is Monument-based Formosa Bites, serving up a delectable variety of Taiwanese delights in the Pikes Peak region.
Be on the lookout for the bright blue truck emblazoned with the slogan: “Happiness you can taste.”
Every member of the family is instrumental in the operation of Formosa Bites, as each plays an enthusiastic role in ensuring its success.
Formosa Bites is a family affair. Owners Terry Hsieh and Doreen Lim pose by their food truck with their two sons.
Terry Hsieh, who was born and raised in Taiwan, prepares and cooks all of the food. His wife, Doreen Lim, focuses on marketing, public relations and media communications. Their young sons take great pride in being an integral part in the accomplishments of the family business. They pass out menus to customers, and take orders while adding a personal touch by sharing their own recommendations.
Early in 2020, Hsieh received the sobering news that he was being laid off from his job in the relocation industry. His skills were both project and managerially based, and he supervised transporting household goods for international moves. Hsieh found himself hitting a wall as he sought employment during the throes of COVID-19. As the months passed, he contemplated his transferable skills: management and teamwork. But also he had a talent for preparing quality food for his family.
He and Lim focused on finding a business opportunity that was within this scope, as well as affordable.
The couple quickly discovered that opening a brick-and-mortar business was cost prohibitive. Their attention turned to opening a trendy food operation on wheels. Fate was on their side when in October, they found and purchased a fully equipped food truck that was within their price range.
Through trial and error, Hsieh developed a menu focusing on his Taiwanese roots. He wanted to go with a unique concept by serving food with a southeastern Asian influence. Food offerings at the business, named Formosa Bites, target what Hsieh calls “street food, or finger food.” Portions are more appetizer-sized, always fresh, handcrafted and made-to-order.
“I’m proud of what I make and serve,” Hsieh said.
Twenty months of unemployment led Hsieh, with his family by his side, to an impressive investment of both faith and heart. The result, Formosa Bites food truck, is worth seeking out.
Terry Hsieh prepares and cooks all the tasty dishes served from Formosa Bites food truck.
After its launch in early 2022, Formosa Bites is rapidly gaining in popularity. Lim plays a very active role in the success of the business. Facebook is used to promote social media reviews; connect with local food groups such as CoS Foodies and 719 Food Truck Connection, and to get the word out through other media resources.
The Formosa Bites brand has been expanding through collaboration with breweries in Monument and Colorado Springs including Pikes Peak Brewing Co., Red Leg Brewing Co., Goat Patch Brewing Co., Trails End Taproom Monument, and Lost Friends Brewing Co., as well as 3 Hundred Days of Shine distillery in Monument. By now, customers seek out where Formosa Bites food truck will be parked.
Hsieh states that his biggest success is the “smile on people’s faces when they try my food. Food does the talking.”
Hsieh’s heart and soul are intertwined in both the present operation and future success of Formosa Bites. It is likely that as summer approaches, the business will become even more popular.
Hsieh and Lim are making tentative plans to eventually move to a larger commercial kitchen, where the preliminary food preparation will be done. What lies ahead is an exciting prospect. They believe that a new space would potentially be able to support some type of carryout counter or catering operation.
Hsieh and Lim are very grateful for the support they receive from the community. They appreciate the positivity that emanates from El Paso County residents who are open to new experiences. This affirmative local attitude toward small businesses is enhanced through word of mouth.
Hsieh said he would eventually like to give back to the community by cooking for those experiencing homelessness in some capacity.
As far as challenges go, Hsieh and Lim find that engaging qualified employees to assist with their expanding business can be difficult. They also seek an understanding from customers that their food can take longer to prepare, as each dish is made-to-order, requiring a sufficient amount of time to serve.
When asked what advice Hsieh would give to like-minded entrepreneurs, he modestly discusses his hope to be an inspiration for others. “Ask a lot of questions,” he said. He feels that the food truck community is very supportive of their members, pointing out, “We are stronger together.” The combination of community and family provides a powerful foundation for growth and success.
The menu for Formosa Bites food truck includes Red Chili Oil Wontons ($14), Pork Belly Slider ($13) and Taiwanese Popcorn Chicken ($10).
The schedule for Formosa Bites food truck can be found on Facebook by searching for “formosabitesco” (https://m.facebook.com/formosabitesco).
Find the business on Instagram: @formosabitesco (instagram.com/formosabitesco/)

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